Robin Hood Coloring Pages Disneyclipscom

Maid Marian is never mentioned in any of the earliest extant ballads of Robin Hood. She appears to have originally been a character in May Games festivities (held during May and early June, most commonly around Whitsun) and is sometimes associated with the Queen or Lady of May or May Day. Jim Lees in The Quest for Robin Hood (p.  81) suggests that Maid Marian was originally a personification of the Virgin Mary.
Francis J. Childe argues that she was originally portrayed as a trull associated with a lascivious Friar Tuck: “She is a trul of trust, to serue a frier at his lust/a prycker a prauncer a terer of shetes/a wagger of ballockes when other men slepes. ”
Both a “Robin” and a “Marian” character were associated with May Day by the 15th century, but these figures were apparently part of separate traditions; the Marian of the May Games is likely derived from the French tradition of a shepherdess named Marion and her shepherd lover Robin, recorded in Adam de la Halle’s Le Jeu de Robin et Marion, circa 1283.
It isn’t clear if there was an association of the early “outlaw” character of Robin Hood and the early “May Day” character Robin, but they did become identified, and associated with the “Marian” character, by the 16th century.
Alexander Barclay, writing in c. 1500, refers to “some merry fytte of Maid Marian or else of Robin Hood”.
Marian remained associated with May Day celebrations even after the association of Robin Hood with May Day had again faded.
The early Robin Hood is also given a “shepherdess” love interest, in Robin Hood’s Birth, Breeding, Valor, and Marriage (Child Ballad 149), his sweetheart is “Clorinda the Queen of the Shepherdesses”. Clorinda survives in some later stories as an alias of Marian.